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Smoke It All

Issue: September 2015

Smoke it all.

This time of year there can be lots of bounty, and lots to smoke up. Don’t limit your smoking to salmon, trout and steelhead. Anytime I have a few racks open in the smoker I go right to the garden or the vegetable crisper. Smoking vegetables gives them a robust flavor that makes a big difference in recipes like salsa and chili. Vegetables can even be smoked and then chopped and frozen for future use.

Cheese is another food that can be taken to another level in the smoker. Smoking cheese is easy and only requires 30 minutes to an hour to achieve optimal flavor. And don’t stop at your appetizers and main dishes for smoking. There are many sweet treats that benefit from a touch of smoke. Think Smokey Rum Soaked Pineapple*, Sweet-Hot Smokey Nuts* or Smoked Dark Chocolate* shaved over homemade vanilla ice cream.

Remember, when smoking foods that may melt at higher temperatures, like cheese and chocolate, keep smoker temperature under 100º. To smoke at lower temperatures, use a cold-smoking apparatus like the Smoke Chief smoke generator from Smokehouse, a smoke adapter or blower, or simply get your smoker chips or pucks smoking and turn off your smoker.

Smoked Vegetable Salsa

• 4 tomatoes
• 3 jalapeño peppers
• 2 red peppers
• 1 onion
• 1 green pepper
• 2 cloves garlic, minced
• 1/2 cup fresh cilantro, chopped
• 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
• 1 tablespoon lemon or lime juice
• 2 teaspoons sugar
• 1 teaspoon cumin
• 1/4 teaspoon salt

Cut tomatoes, peppers and onion in halves or fourths. Place on smoker racks. Smoke at 180º-200º 2-3 hours or until vegetables are soft. Remove from smoker and let cool. If skins from peppers or tomatoes have loosened, they may be removed. For a milder salsa, remove ribs and seeds from jalapeños. Chop or dice tomatoes, peppers and onions. Place in a medium bowl. Add remaining ingredients and gently stir until combined. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

*Additional recipes available at www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

Note: For signed copies of Tiffany Haugen’s popular cookbook, Grill It!, Plank It!, Wrap It!, Smoke It!, Note: For signed copies of Tiffany’s latest book, Grill It!, Plank It!, Wrap It!, Smoke It!, send a check for $20.00 (free S&H) to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489, or visit www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

Tiffany Haugen is a full-time author and part of the new online series, Cook With Cabela’s. Also, watch for her on The Sporting Chef, on the Sportsman Channel.

Canning Salmon and Steelhead

Issue: August 2015

Canning takes just a few pieces of equipment; pressure canner, jars and lids. The only ingredients needed are fish and salt. The work that goes into canning pays off every time you open one of those jars for many months to come.

With another banner year of fall salmon and steelhead fishing upon us, where to put all that extra meat can be a challenge. One of the best preservation methods for all kinds of fish and game is canning. Not only is this a shelf-stable, long-lasting, simple method that has been around for a long time, it makes fast food, good food! Adding canned fish to salads, sandwiches, casseroles, chowders and croquettes turns any meal into a protein-rich, delicious treat.

Canning takes just a few pieces of equipment; pressure canner, jars and lids. The only ingredients needed are fish and salt. The work that goes into canning pays off every time you open one of those jars for many months to come.

When pressure canning anything, refer to the instructions on your pressure canner or an approved canning cookbook or home extension website. DO NOT just make up your own recipes and can them, this is dangerous territory for experimentation. The guidelines I follow are from Pacific Northwest Extension as well as directions from my All-American Pressure Canner.

For raw-pack salmon, remove all skin and bones and cut meat into 1-inch strips. Fill sterilized pint jars with meat, leaving 1-inch headspace. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt to the jar. Wipe jar rim clean and place lids on jars. Fill pressure canner with 2 inches of water. Add jars to canner and cover. Heat canner until steam begins to escape from pressure vent. Allow steam to escape for 7 minutes before adding 10# weight to pressure vent.

When canner reaches 10# of pressure, set timer for 100 minutes. Adjust heat as needed to keep canner at 10# pressure for the entire canning time. After 100 minutes, turn off heat and allow pressure to drop to zero. Once pressure has dropped to zero, remove jars and allow to cool at room temperature. Check for seal. If jars do not seal, eat meat immediately or store in the refrigerator and eat within three days. If jars crack or break, discard. 

Note: For signed copies of Tiffany’s latest book, Cooking Seafood, send a check for $20.00 (free S&H), to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489. This and other cookbooks can also be ordered at www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

Tiffany Haugen is a full-time author and part of the new online series, Cook With Cabela’s. Also, watch for her on The Sporting Chef, on the Sportsman Channel.

Bivalves On The Grill

Issue: June 2015

Bivalves On The Grill

Whether it’s an all-day excursion digging clams and gathering oysters or just a side trip paired with fishing, shellfish provides excellent table fare. Grilling bivalves is one of the easiest ways to prepare this versatile and fun-to-gather protein source.

With most seafood, cooking times vary between 3-10 minutes on the grill, so dinner is ready fast. All you need to enjoy these delicacies are a few seasonings. Even if you only have salt, pepper and a squeeze of lemon, you’re in good shape.

Grilled Clams & Mussels
• 2-4 pounds clams or mussels

Citrus Butter Sauce
• 1 cup orange juice
• 2 tablespoons lemon or lime juice
• 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
• 1/4 cup softened butter
• 1 teaspoon chili sauce

In a small saucepan bring juices and vinegar to a boil. Remove from heat and whisk in butter and chili sauce. Clean and rinse clam and/or mussel shells. Place on a hot grill and close the lid. If bivalves are small, place on foil or a grill grate. Grill 5-10 minutes or until shells begin to open. Get clams and/or mussels off the grill immediately so they don’t fall backward and lose their liquid. Spoon one teaspoon of sauce into each shell before serving.

Grilled Oysters
• 16-20 oysters

To Grill Whole
Clean and rinse oysters. Discard any open or broken shells. Place on a hot grill and close the lid. (To keep grill clean, use foil or a grill mat under oysters.) Grill 4-5 minutes or until oysters just begin to open. Get oysters off the grill immediately so they don’t overcook. Shuck and serve with a slice of lemon.

To Grill Shucked
Clean, rinse and shuck oysters. Discard the flatter, top shell and arrange the bottom shells with the oysters in them on a hot grill. Close the lid and grill 3-4 minutes. Top with Citrus Butter Sauce or drizzle with Garlic Sauce. 

Recipe Note: Because oysters can be consumed raw, there is no specific doneness they need to reach. Based on taste, some prefer the oysters barely warm (2 minutes on the grill) and others may prefer a well-done oyster (7-8 minutes on the grill).

Garlic Sauce
• 1/4 cup olive oil
• 1/3 cup chopped garlic
• 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley and/or cilantro
• 1/4 cup lime juice
• 1/4 cup orange juice
• 1/2 teaspoon cumin
• 1/4 teaspoon oregano
• Salt and pepper to taste

In a small saucepan, sauté garlic 5 minutes on low heat. Remove from heat and cool. Place all ingredients in a food chopper or processor and puree until smooth.

Note: For signed copies of Tiffany’s latest book, Cooking Seafood, send a check for $20.00 (free S&H), to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489. This and other cookbooks can also be ordered at www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

Tiffany Haugen is a full-time author and part of the new online series, Cook With Cabela’s. Also, watch for her on The Sporting Chef, on the Sportsman Channel.

Smoker Chip Salmon

Issue: May 2015

Smoker Chip Salmon

With sport show season wrapped up, it’s time to hit the water for some fresh salmon and steelhead. Every year during my seminars, I get great ideas from the attendees and other presenters, many of them STS readers.

The idea for Smoker Chip Salmon came from Herb Good. A combination of plank cooking and putting a packet of smoker chips in a hot grill, this method is a fabulous way to cook just about any kind of fish with the skin on. All you need is a little salt and pepper or top with a favorite rub or creamy sauce combination. With sunny days ahead, I can never get enough ideas for camp cooking or shore lunches.

Smoker Chip Fish
• 1/2 pound salmon or steelhead fillet, skin-on
• 2 tablespoons sour cream or Greek yogurt
• 2 teaspoons chopped fresh dill or 1 teaspoon dried dill
• 1 teaspoon lemon zest
• 1 teaspoon sugar, optional
• 1/4 teaspoon granulated onion
• 1/4 teaspoon salt
• 1/4 white pepper
• Lemon slices

Instructions
n a small bowl, mix sour cream or Greek yogurt, dill, zest, sugar, onion, salt and pepper until thoroughly combined. On a large double layer of foil, place about 2 cups smoker chips/chunks. Poke 5 holes with a sharp knife under chips/chunks. Place salmon, skin side down, on chips/chunks. Spread creamy mixture on salmon and top with lemon slices. Close foil around fish and place in a hot grill or on a rack over an open fire. Cook fish 10-15 minutes or until fish is no longer opaque and reaches an internal temperature of at least 135º.

Recipe Note: Any fish can be used, as well as any seasonings. The key is making sure the skin is on the chips/chunks to prevent them from getting on the meat. When smoke-cooking, I like to use an internal thermometer to ensure perfect doneness and keep cooking worry-free. Suggested woods for smoke-cooking fish include maple, alder, apple or cherry.

Note: For signed copies of Tiffany’s latest book, Cooking Seafood, send a check for $20.00 (free S&H), to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489. This and other cookbooks can also be ordered at www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

Tiffany Haugen is a full-time author and part of the new online series, Cook With Cabela’s. Also, watch for her on The Sporting Chef, on the Sportsman Channel.

Italian Smoked Salmon

Issue: March 2015

Italian Smoked Salmon

If you haven’t made it to a sportshow this season, it’s not too late. This month there are still a few shows going on across the country. One of the topics we talk about a lot to passers by in our booth is smoking fish. Many have their favorite recipe they wouldn’t dare change, others are constantly looking for something new. Developed as a recipe to deeply flavor fish and taste completely different from traditional smoked salmon, this month’s recipe puts flavors into fish that you may never have tried. It may sound a bit strange, but placed on an antipasto plate with olives, cured meats and aged cheeses, Italian Smoked Salmon, fits in perfectly.

Note: For signed copies of Tiffany’s new book, Cooking Seafood, send a check for $20.00 (free S&H), to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489. This and other cookbooks can also be ordered at www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

Tiffany Haugen is a full-time author and part of the new online series, Cook With Cabela’s. Also, watch for her on The Sporting Chef, on the Sportsman Channel.

Ingredients:  
• 1 1/2 quarts water
• 1 cup white sugar
• 1/2 cup non-iodized salt
• 1 cup red or white wine
• 3 tablespoons minced garlic
• 1 tablespoon granulated onion
• 8 tablespoons Italian seasoning
• 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper

Instructions
1. Mix the above ingredients in a large bowl with a wire whisk until sugar is dissolved.
2. Submerge fish in brine skin side down on the bottom layer, meat side down on the next layer. Repeat layering skin to skin, meat to meat.
3. Place a weighted plate on top of the fish to fully submerge all meat.
4. Soak fish in brine 2-3 hours.
5. Lightly rinse fish to remove most of the seasonings. Some is desirable but too much may become charred in the smoking process.
6. Place on racks and air dry until pellicle is formed, 1-3 hours.
7. Smoke to desired texture. Cooking time varies from 3-10 hours, depending on the smoker, volume of fish being smoked and outdoor conditions. Check frequently so as not to overcook. 

Salmon Sticks

Issue: February 2015

Salmon Sticks

For our family, this is the time of year our freezer is packed with meat of all kinds. With four active hunters we have deer, elk, bear, turkey, waterfowl, various game birds and lots of fish waiting to be prepared.

Much of our fish and game is canned, which saves a great deal of freezer space, but we sometimes struggle with freezer organization. We have three freezers and try to keep preserved meats and produce in one, big game in another and birds and fish in the third. Birds and fish have the shortest freezer life, so we try to use them within six months.

Don’t let too much time pass before you defrost that beautiful chinook you caught this summer, though. For best results, always defrost fish under refrigeration. Plan ahead and put fish on the menu a couple times a week or get that smoker going on the porch. This recipe is kid-friendly, and loved by adults, and can be either baked or pan fried.

  Salmon Sticks
• 1 pound salmon or steelhead
• 1/2 lemon
• 1/2 cup sour cream or Greek yogurt
• 1 beaten egg
• 1/2 cup flour
• 1/4 cup cornmeal
• 1/2 teaspoon salt
• 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
• 1/4 teaspoon granulated garlic
• 1/4 teaspoon granulated onion
• 1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
• 3 tablespoons olive or coconut oil*

Fillet and remove skin from fish. Cut into strips across the grain. Remove any remaining bones using a fish tweezers. Squeeze fresh lemon over fish strips.

In a medium bowl, whisk sour cream or yogurt and egg until thoroughly combined. In a shallow dish or sealable plastic bag, mix remaining dry ingredients.

Begin by dipping fish in egg mixture, then coat with flour mixture. 

Heat oil in a large skillet on medium-high. Pan fry fish 1-2 minutes per side or until golden brown.

*Recipe Alternative: To bake instead of pan fry, spray both the baking sheet and the fish with a light coating of non-stick cooking spray. Bake in a preheated 400º oven, 12-15 minutes or until fish is no longer opaque.

Note: For signed copies of Tiffany’s new book, Cooking Seafood, send a check for $20.00 (free S&H), to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489. This and other cookbooks can also be ordered at www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

Tiffany Haugen is a full-time author and part of the new online series, Cook With Cabela’s.

Shrimp & Potato Curry

Issue: January 2015

Shrimp & Potato Curry

Happy New Year! As I reflect on my success of last year’s “cook more in a Dutch oven resolution,” I am excited about my 2015 goal to eat more seafood. With our hunt/fish/gather lifestyle, we are blessed with plenty of delights from the Pacific Northwest, but we can’t just go out and get any kind of seafood, any time of the year, on our own. We do have some amazing local fish markets though. So whether it’s ahi tuna, shrimp or oysters, I want to prepare more seafood in my kitchen. Not to mention the added benefit that if I cook it myself, I can eat at least three times the amount, dollar for dollar. Shrimp & Potato Curry is a fast, easy comfort food and can be made with fresh or frozen shrimp.

Shrimp & Potato Curry  

• 1 pound yam, sweet or baking potato
• 1 tablespoon peanut or coconut oil
• 1” fresh ginger, minced
• 1 tablespoon red curry paste
• 1 tablespoon brown sugar
• 1 teaspoon fish sauce
• 1 cup finely sliced kale or spinach
• 1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined
• 1 cup coconut milk
• 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
• 1/2 cup fresh basil and/or cilantro, chopped

Pre-cook potato by baking, boiling or microwaving. Peel and cut into 1” cubes.

In a large skillet, heat oil on medium heat. Add ginger and sauté one minute. Add red curry paste and brown sugar, sauté until bubbly. Add fish sauce, shrimp and potatoes. Continue to cook 1-2 minutes, stirring potatoes gently. Reduce heat to low and add coconut milk. Simmer 5 minutes. Remove from heat, add herbs and stir in lime juice.

Note: For signed copies of Tiffany’s new book, Cooking Seafood, send a check for $20.00 (free S&H), to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489. This and other cookbooks can also be ordered at www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

Tiffany Haugen is a full-time author and part of the new online series, Cook With Cabela’s. To meet Tiffany and get signed books in person, see her husband, Scott’s, feature in this issue of STS for a look at their speaking schedule.

Fisherman’s Paella

Issue: December 2014

Fisherman’s Paella

Let the countdown to Christmas begin! Planning ahead makes this time of year less stressful and more enjoyable so why not start thinking about those special holiday meals now? My go-to plan for holiday entertaining is the one-pot meal. Be it a hearty pot of Pheasant & Dumplings, Venison Chili in the slow cooker, Crab Lasagna (STS Sept./Oct. 2014 issue) or an elegant Fisherman’s Paella; putting it all in one pot gives me more time to spend with my guests.

This recipe lends itself to what you have in your freezer, or what you can easily find at a seafood market. Anything can be substituted, even chicken breasts can be added, just aim for 3-4 pounds of meat/fish/shellfish.

Fisherman’s Paella
• 1 tablespoon olive oil
• 8 ounces chorizo
• 2/3 cup chopped onion
• 2/3 cup chopped orange bell pepper
• 2/3 cup chopped green bell pepper
• 2 tablespoons chopped garlic
• 1 1/2 cups Arborio or medium-grain rice
• 3 cups seafood or chicken broth
• 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
• 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
• 1/2 teaspoon saffron threads or 1 teaspoon turmeric
• 5-7 mussels and/or 7-8 clams
• 5 large scallops (optional)
• 10-15 raw shrimp
• 1/2 pound bottom fish, cubed
• 1/2 pound salmon or steelhead, cubed
• 1 tomato, seeded and chopped
• 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

In a large, ovenproof skillet, sauté chorizo in olive oil on medium-high heat until crumbled. Add onion, pepper and garlic and continue to sauté an additional 2 minutes. Add rice and sauté 2 minutes. Add broth and seasonings and bring to a boil. Layer clams and/or mussels, along with the fish, evenly over rice mixture. Cover and place in a preheated 400º oven 10 minutes. Remove cover and without stirring, evenly place scallops, shrimp and tomatoes around the pan. Cover and return to the oven an additional 10-12 minutes or until shrimp are pink and rice has soaked up most of the liquid. Garnish with fresh parsley. 

Note: For signed copies of Tiffany’s new book, Cooking Seafood, send a check for $20.00 (free S&H), to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489. This and other cookbooks can also be ordered at www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

Tiffany Haugen is a full-time author and part of the new online series, Cook With Cabela’s.

Crab Lasagna

Issue: October 2014

Crab Lasagna

In addition to fall salmon fishing, crabbing opportunities still abound throughout the Pacific Northwest. Whether headed out for fresh crab, or if you have plenty stashed in the freezer from earlier in the season, there’s no debating it’s delectable table fare.

Although nothing beats fresh crab on ice, eaten right out of the shell, there are preparations that make the most of frozen* or canned crab meat. Crab Lasagna has been a family favorite for years. This recipe takes a little work but the rewards are more than worth it, and if you’re lucky, you’ll enjoy leftovers for a day or two. If leaving on a camping trip or throwing a fall dinner party, prepare a day ahead of time. If your herb or greens garden is still going, toss in up to 1/2 cup additional chopped fresh herbs (basil, chives, cilantro) or greens (spinach, kale, chard) along with the parsley.

Crab Lasagna
• 1/2 cup butter
• 3 teaspoons chopped garlic
• 1 teaspoon lemon zest
• 1/2 cup flour
• 2 cups milk
• 1 1/2 cups chicken broth
• 2 cups ricotta or cottage cheese
• 1 egg
• 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
• 1/2 teaspoon salt
• 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
• 9 uncooked lasagna noodles
• 1 1/2 cups shredded mozzarella or cheddar cheese
• 1/2 cup shredded parmesan cheese
• 3 cups crab meat

Melt butter in a medium saucepan on medium heat. Lightly sauté garlic and lemon zest. Add flour, stirring constantly with a wire whisk. When mixture begins to bubble turn heat to low and slowly add milk and chicken broth. Bring mixture to a boil, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and set aside.

In a separate bowl mix ricotta or cottage cheese, egg, parsley, salt and pepper. In a 9” x 13” casserole dish, spread white sauce to coat the pan bottom. Layer with 3 uncooked lasagna noodles, 1/3 of the cheese/egg mixture, 1/3 of the crab, 1/3 of the mozzarella and parmesan cheeses. Repeat the layering 2 more times, making sure cheese is the final layer.

Bake, uncovered at 350º for 50-60 minutes. Let stand at least 10 minutes before serving.

Freezing crab meat is easy.  Remove shells, lay meat on a baking sheet and par-freeze 45 minutes. Vacuum seal in small batches and freeze up to 8 months. Great for mixing into dips (hot or cold), salads and pasta dishes.

Note: For signed copies of Tiffany’s new book, Cooking Seafood, send a check for $20.00 (free S&H), to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489. This and other cookbooks can also be ordered at www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

Tiffany Haugen is a full-time author and part of the new online series, Cook With Cabela’s.

Hog-Tied Steelhead

Issue: September 2014

Hog-Tied Steelhead

From a jalepeño popper to a plank-cooked game bird, just about anything is “better with bacon.” This advice certainly applies in the fish world, too, as most fish is lean and adding a little bacon in one form or another helps keep fish moist while adding a big flavor boost.

With smaller steelhead and trout, we like wrapping them in bacon and cooking them on the grill, pellet smoker or over an open fire in a fish basket. This also works nicely with jack salmon, red salmon, small coho and half-pounder steelhead.


Hog-Tied Steelhead 
• 1 small steelhead (or trout), scaled and cleaned
• Seasoning salt
• 4-6 slices bacon
• 1 small red onion
• 2 teaspoons minced garlic

Remove fish heads if desired. Season inside and outside of fish with seasoning salt or salt and pepper. Stuff onion and garlic into fish cavity. Starting at one end of the fish, wrap each slice of bacon around the fish. Try to get the bacon in an even layer without overlapping. The easiest way to secure the bacon to the fish is to wrap it like a roast. Tie a long piece of kitchen twine to one end of the fish leaving a short piece and the long piece. Continue to wrap the long piece of string around the fish, looping through to secure each time. At the end of the fish, tie another knot and bacon should stay securely wrapped around fish.

On a hot grill or heavy skillet, sear bacon on both sides. Beware of flare-ups on the grill. Move fish to indirect heat or place on foil or in a 375º oven and cook 20-25 minutes or until fish reaches an internal temperature of at least 140º. Remove kitchen twine before serving.

Recipe Alternative: For an easier method, lay bacon lengthwise on fish and wrap in foil. Broil 3-5 minutes to crisp bacon before serving.

Note: For signed copies of Tiffany’s new book, Cooking Seafood, send a check for $20.00 (free S&H), to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489. This and other cookbooks can also be ordered at www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

Tiffany Haugen is a full-time author and part of the new online series, Cook With Cabela’s.

Lemon Parsley Clams

Issue: August 2014

Lemon Parsley Clams

If you haven’t been out clam digging yet, get the needed gear and head to the mudflats. Clams are plentiful on the Pacific Coast this time of year, and make for a fun family day, gathering in the sun, and some amazing eating come dinnertime.

Shellfish is one of the quickest meals to prepare, taking just a few minutes on the stovetop or grill. Clams are a high-protein, low-fat, nutrient-dense food that pairs well with many ingredients. From simple steamers to cockles to mud clams chopped in chowder or ground into dip, clams are versatile.

If not eaten fresh, we preserve by vacuum sealing. Clams can be vacuum sealed when raw or steamed. To get the best seal, partially freeze shelled clams 30-45 minutes prior to sealing. Whole or minced half-pints of clams can also be steamed and pressure canned at 11 pounds pressure for 60 minutes. (Always follow Food Safety Guidelines for Canning Clams.) If cooking small clams in the shell, here’s a recipe everyone will love.

• 2 tablespoons butter
• 1 cup sliced leeks
• 6 cloves garlic
• 1 cup dry white wine
• 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
• 1 lemon, cut in wedges
• Black pepper to taste

For fresh dug clams, the FDA’s recommendations are to soak clams for several hours in seawater (or 1/3 cup coarse kosher salt and 1 gallon water) to which you have added 1 cup cornmeal. Use kosher or sea salt as the iodine in regular salt will kill the clams before they hit the boiling water. One hour before serving, scrub clams with vegetable brush in cold water; rinse with water until free of sand (adding a little coarse salt to the water will help remove the sand from the clams).

In a large skillet with a lid, melt butter on medium heat. Sauté leeks in butter 4-5 minutes. Add garlic, sautéing an additional minute. Add wine and turn heat to high, bringing wine to a boil. Add clams and cover. Cook 5-7 minutes or until clam shells begin to open. Remove from heat, add parsley and a few squeezes of lemon. Discard any unopened clams before serving.

Recipe Alternative  
For an Asian flair, add 2” sliced ginger, 1/2 tablespoon chili sauce and 1 stalk pounded lemongrass to the leeks. Mussels can be substituted for clams in this recipe and recipe alternative. 

Note: For signed copies of Tiffany’s new book, Cooking Seafood, send a check for $20.00 (free S&H), to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489. This and other cookbooks can also be ordered at www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

Tahini Sturgeon

Issue: June 2014

Tahini Sturgeon

For those who’ve fished for sturgeon, you know how fun it can be. For those who’ve eaten sturgeon, you know good it is.

Not just for sturgeon, this highly flavorful presentation goes well with any type of fish, from ling cod to salmon to trout. The Green Sauce is excellent tossed with shrimp or used as a liquid base for steaming clams. Tahini Sturgeon can be grilled or baked. If prepared in foil, open for last 5 minutes to caramelize the top. In a pinch, or if looking for something to prepare while camping, simply slather on a mixture of equal parts basil pesto and prepared hummus.

Tahini Sturgeon
• 1 pound sturgeon fillet
• 2 tablespoons Green Sauce
• 2 tablespoons tahini
• 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
• 1 tablespoon olive oil
• 2 teaspoons honey
• 1 teaspoon minced garlic
• 1 teaspoon chili sauce
• 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest
• 1/2 teaspoon cumin
• 1/2 cup slivered almonds

Cut fish to desired serving sizes. Coat the top of each serving with Green Sauce. Let sit 20 minutes at room temperature.

In a small bowl, whisk tahini, lemon juice, oil, honey, garlic, chili sauce, lemon zest and cumin until thoroughly combined. Place fish in a greased baking pan for the oven or a foil packet for the grill or Dutch oven. Divide tahini mixture, coating the top of each serving. Sprinkle with slivered almonds.

Bake in a preheated 375º oven or on a medium-hot grill 13-15 minutes or until fish is no longer opaque and reaches an internal temperature of at least 135º.

Green Sauce
• 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves
• Juice from 2 lemons
• 2 tablespoons sugar
• 2 cloves garlic
• 2 large jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped
• 1/4 cup walnut pieces
• 1/2 teaspoon salt

In a food processor or mini-chopper, blend all ingredients until thoroughly combined. Serve immediately or keep refrigerated in a sealed container. This sauce is wonderful with any grilled food or used as a tortilla chip dip.

Note: For signed copies of Tiffany’s new book, Cooking Seafood, send a check for $20.00 (free S&H), to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489. This and other cookbooks can also be ordered at www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

Salmon Jerky

Issue: May 2014

Cabela’s 10-Tray Digital Dehydrator is great for handling large volumes of salmon. It’s temperature control also runs consistently.

Any kind of jerky is popular at our house, from bear to deer to turkey to goose. With just a few ingredients and some time, just about any protein source can be turned into jerky, which is not only a tasty snack but a great way to preserve your catch. Salmon jerky is no exception.

Different from traditionally smoked salmon in that it is a bit dryer with a chewy texture, salmon jerky has many applications. Eaten as is, crumbled over a salad, tossed in a chowder or stirred into pasta, this highly flavorful fish adds a wow-factor to many dishes. Salmon jerky can be made in the smoker, oven or food dehydrator. The trick is keeping the heat low (under 160º) so the thinly sliced strips of fish dry slowly and don’t “cook.”



Salmon Jerky
• 2-3 pounds salmon
• 1 quart water
• 1/3 cup canning salt, kosher salt or Morton TenderQuick
• 2 cups brown sugar
• 1 tablespoon liquid smoke*
• 1 tablespoon white or black pepper


Additional Ingredients (optional):
• Cayenne Pepper
• Red Pepper Flakes
• Honey

Cut salmon into desired smoking pieces, either across the fillet or in long strips. In a large glass or ceramic container, mix water with salt, sugar, liquid smoke* and pepper, whisking until sugar is dissolved. Submerge fish in brine and place a weighted plate on top of fish to keep fully submerged. Soak fish 4-8 hours, gently stirring, occasionally. Drain fish from brine, discarding brine. Pat fish dry with paper towels. Add any additional flavors at this time; a sprinkle of cayenne or red pepper flakes or a brush of honey. Place fish on racks and air dry about an hour until a pellicle forms.

For the oven or dehydrator, dry 5-8 hours at 150º or until fish reaches desired texture. For the smoker, smoke 3-5 hours at 160º. Replenish chips as often as needed to keep a constant smoke for at least 2 hours of smoking time. Smoke times vary according to smoker brands, fish thickness and outdoor temperatures. Check fish often and finish cooking to desired texture in a 165º oven if necessary. Cover and refrigerate fish until ready to serve.

*Liquid smoke is an optional ingredient but is highly recommended if making jerky in the oven or dehydrator.

Note: For signed copies of Tiffany’s new book, Cooking Seafood, send a check for $20.00 (free S&H), to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489. This and other cookbooks can also be ordered at www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

Creamy Trout Casserole

Issue: April 2014

Trout Casserole

Trout season is here, and fish are thriving in rivers, streams and lakes. Our first catch of the season is always dredged in cornmeal and fried in butter, and others are grilled on the BBQ or cooked over an open fire in a grill basket. There usually isn’t much in the way of leftovers when it comes to trout, but if there are, flake the fish off the bone and turn it into a delicious, creamy comfort food.

This recipe also works well with smoked or poached fish. To poach trout, bring 2-3 cups chicken or vegetable broth to a boil in a large saucepan or high-sided skillet. Remove heads and tails from cleaned trout and place in boiling water. Cover and cook for 5-10 minutes or until skin begins to peel away and meat separates from the spine.

Creamy Trout Casserole

• 3 cups cooked trout
• 1/4 cup + 1 tablespoon butter
• 1 cup minced onion
• 3 teaspoons minced garlic
• 2 tablespoons whole wheat flour
• 2 cups milk
• 2 cups grated cheese (Cheddar, Colby and/or Jack)
• Salt & black pepper to taste
• 1/3 cup panko or breadcrumbs

Remove all skin and bones from trout and crumble into bite-sized chunks. In a medium saucepan on medium-high heat, sauté onions and garlic in 1/4 cup butter until soft. Add flour and whisk until bubbly. Slowly add milk, bringing to a low-boil, stirring constantly until thickened.

Place a small amount of sauce in an 8” x 8” greased baking dish. Spread 1/2 of the trout into the baking dish. Top fish with 1 cup cheese and 1/2 of the sauce. Continue layering with the remainder of the fish, cheese and sauce.

In a small bowl, melt remaining tablespoon of butter. Mix with panko/breadcrumbs. Top casserole with buttered panko/breadcrumbs. Bake in a preheated 350º oven 25-30 minutes.

Note: For signed copies of Tiffany’s new book, Cooking Seafood, send a check for $20.00 (free S&H), to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489. This and other cookbooks can also be ordered at www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

Smokey Fish Latkes

Issue: March 2014

Fish Latkes

Do you have a fresh steelhead or early season springer in the smoker? Before it all gets gobbled up, reserve a little for this fantastic latke.

Latkes can also be made with cooked or canned fish, but are really tasty with smoked fish. We tend to smoke up large batches of fish at a time and find that some of the smaller chunks tend to be a bit saltier and definitely get drier when smoked. These are the pieces that work perfectly tossed in a fish cake, creamy pasta, dip or a quiche. Also, smoked fish that’s been vacuum sealed and frozen, freshens right up in a complementary recipe.

This recipe is great with smoked salmon, steelhead, even trout, but we’ve enjoyed it with smoked halibut, sturgeon and more. Don’t be afraid to try various types of fish, because with this recipe you can’t go wrong.

Smokey Fish Latkes

• 3 cups grated potatoes
• 1 1/2 cups flaked smoked salmon or steelhead (or other fish)
• 2 tablespoons minced shallot
• 2 tablespoons flour
• 1/4 teaspoon salt
• 1/4 teaspoon pepper
• 2 beaten eggs
• Peanut or coconut oil for frying
• Chili sauce for garnish

Grate potatoes into a large bowl of cold water. Drain potatoes and place in a clean dish towel. Squeeze all moisture out of potatoes and spread on a clean, dry towel. In a large bowl, mix shallot, flour, salt, pepper and eggs until thoroughly combined. Add grated potatoes and fish, gently mixing.

Heat 1/4” oil in a skillet on medium-high heat. Carefully place latkes by rounded tablespoonful into hot oil, pressing to flatten with the back of the spoon. Fry 2-3 minutes per side or until golden brown. Serve warm or at room temperature with a dash of chili sauce.

*Cooked salmon or steelhead mixed with 1/2 teaspoon liquid smoke can be used in place of smoked fish.

Note: For signed copies of Tiffany’s new book, Cooking Seafood, send a check for $20.00 (free S&H), to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489. This and other cookbooks can also be ordered at www.tiffanyhaugen.com.

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